Building Neighbhourhoods

Coal Harbour

The name Coal Harbour is also used to designate a relatively new official neighbourhood of the City of Vancouver. The neighbourhood is bounded to the southeast by Burrard Street, to the southwest by West Georgia and Pender Streets, and to the northwest by Stanley Park. The northwestern section features parkland, private marinas, several rowing and boating clubs and a community centre designed by architect Gregory Henriquez. Towards the Financial District in the southeast, and across Georgia Street, the neighbourhood is dominated by high-rise office and apartment buildings. Much of the area between Hastings Street and Georgia Street is part of the city's business district and in the days when it was an upper-class residential district West Pender Street was known as Blueblood Alley because of the many large mansions along it. The six floating homes in Coal Harbour, along with the twelve in False Creek are the only legal floating homes in the city of Vancouver.

Gastown

Gastown is a national historic site in VancouverBritish Columbia, at the northeast end of Downtown adjacent to the Downtown Eastside.[1][2] Its historical boundaries were the waterfront (now Water Street and the CPR tracks), Columbia Street, Hastings Street, and Cambie Street, which were the borders of the 1870 townsite survey, the proper name and postal address of which was Granville, B.I. ("Burrard Inlet"). The official boundary[citation needed] does not include most of Hastings Street except for the Woodward's and Dominion Buildings, and stretches east past Columbia St., to the laneway running parallel to the west side of Main Street.

Crosstown

Crosstown is conveniently located between West Pender Street & Expo Blvd (North to South) & Cambie Street to Main Street (East to West). Being situated just South of Historic Gastown and East of Historic China Town, Crosstown Vancouver is located in the middle of the oldest and most cultural areas of Downtown Vancouver.

Crosstown Vancouver is Downtown Vancouvers Newest Community / Neighbourhod.  Crosstown has had a large number of new condos hit the market recently. With the Espana Development freshly completing & adding another 416 new units to the neighbourhood, the area is buzzing with new life.

False Creek

False Creek is a short inlet in the heart of Vancouver. It separates downtown from the rest of the city. It was named by George Henry Richards during his Hydrographic survey of 1856-63. Science World is located at its eastern end, with the GranvilleCambie, and the Burrard (which is furthest west) Street bridges crossing False Creek. The Canada Line tunnel crosses underneath False Creek just west of the Cambie Bridge. It is one of the four major bodies of water bordering Vancouver along with English BayBurrard Inlet and the Fraser River. In 1986 it was the location of the Expo 86 World's Fair.

Yaletown

Yaletown is an area of Downtown Vancouver approximately bordered by False Creek, Robson, and Homer Streets. Formerly a heavy industrial area dominated by warehouses and rail yards, since the Expo 86, it has been transformed into one of the most densely populated neighbourhoods in the city. The marinas, parks, high rise apartment blocks, and converted heritage buildings constitute one of the most significant urban regeneration projects in North America.

West End

The West End of VancouverBritish ColumbiaCanada is on the downtown peninsula neighbouring Stanley Park and the areas of YaletownCoal Harbour and the downtown financial and central business districts.

The definition of the "official neighbourhood" of the West End, according to the city, is the area west of Burrard Street, east of Denman Street, and south of West Georgia Street.[1] Historically the term originated and remains used by Vancouverites to refer to everything from Burrard Street to Stanley Park, including the Stanley Park Neighbourhood west of Denman Street and the Coal Harbour Neighbourhood. Coal Harbour Neighbourhood is officially designated as west of Burrard and to the north of West Georgia, although the newly built areas between West Pender Street and the waterfront are expressly "Coal Harbour" and not considered part of the West End.

Kitsilano

Kitsilano is a neighbourhood in the city of VancouverBritish ColumbiaCanada.[1] Known colloquially as "Kits", the neighbourhood is named after Squamish chief August Jack Khatsahlano. Kitsilano is located in Vancouver's West Side along the south shore of English Bay, between the neighbourhoods of West Point Grey and Fairview.[2] With a population of 40,595 people as of 2006, the area is mostly residential with two main commercial areas, West 4th Avenue and West Broadway, known for their retail stores, restaurants and organic food markets.[2] Notable landmarks in Kitsilano include the Burrard BridgeKitsilano Beach, and the Museum of Vancouver/H. R. MacMillan Space Centre.

The neighbourhood has played host to a number of annual events such as the Vancouver International Children's Festival, the Bard on the Beachoutdoor Shakespeare festival, and the Celebration of Light fireworks competition. Kitsilano is the current or former home of a number of famous residents including environmentalist David Suzuki, writers William Gibson and Philip K. Dick, actors Ryan ReynoldsJason Priestley, and Joshua Jackson, ice hockey players Trevor Linden and Ryan Kesler, and comedian Brent Butt.

South Granville

Located just a few minutes away from downtown Vancouver and easily accessible from all over the Lower Mainland, South Granville is an inviting neighbourhood full of attractions for all tastes.

For gourmet lovers, South Granville boasts a variety of fascinating stores and award-winning restaurants, while fashionistas can shop the latest trends in the many designer boutiques. Lovers of fine art or beautiful interiors will equally be delighted by the many galleries, antique collections and designer décor stores across the neighbourhood.

With something always to surprise, entertain and delight, South Granville offers a wealth of activities to enjoy. While you might simply come to enjoy a coffee or browse the many stores around, you’ll soon find yourself tempted to linger for a gallery viewing or perhaps meet friends for dinner. That’s what makes South Granville unique as a neighbourhood – come for an hour or the day and there’s always something to do.